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Board in search of new mower

BY Kaitlin Gebby - kgebby@chronicle-tribune.com

The Markle Park Board addressed the issue of a recently damaged lawn mower during their meeting on Monday, and Mike Grant of the Markle Historical Society provided an update on a new historical site in the area.

Rick Asher, a park board member, explained that the lawn mower was damaged while pulling a trailer some time last week. As a result, Asher had to use his own home equipment to complete work in place of the damaged mower. He requested an estimated budget for purchasing a new lawn mower.

Board Member Marilyn Lahr suggested Asher check out a similar tractor she had purchased not long ago, offering it to the Town of Markle for the board to use. Markle Police Officer John Markley said if Asher wished to buy a new mower, which would also be used to water plants around town, he could spend up to $2,500.

At the last board meeting, members paid Gray’s Landscaping $1,370 for their work on repainting the Markle welcome sign on Ind. 224.

After the meeting, Grant said volunteers came to the Draper Log Home in the spring to help clear out the vinyl flooring and continue working to remodel the historical site.

“Our town has a population of 1,102 and we had over 500 people sign up to work in the community for two hours that day. (It was) kind of neat,” he said.

The log cabin was discovered during a demolition when workers removed the siding of the home to reveal the siding of the wooden home that was likely one of the first built in the area in the 1830s, according to Grant.

They’d recently finished placing the home on a new cement foundation in Old Mill Park in Markle after receiving a grant, but he said those funds are nearly gone.

“The project is slow going,” he said. “We’ll continue progress as we get more funds and we’re applying for more now.”

Grant said they hope to convert the home to show its transition over time, maintaining both the old and new siding. The next step is to locate the proper materials to restore the cedar siding, which Grant said may be difficult since they’re looking to find wood cut in the same way it as when it was originally built in the early to mid-1800s.